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10/22/2021   

Modem Problems


Often, problem connecting and staying connected to FamilyNet can be fixed by switching to our Alternate Dial-Up number: 622-1263. To see how to do this, click here.

If you are having problems connecting to FamilyNet, have a slow connection, or you are experiencing frequent disconnects, please read this page.

There are several reasons for these types of modem problems:

Call Waiting
Call Notes™ - SBC Telephone
Windows Family Logon
Windows Extended Uptime
Phone Line Condition
Modem Reliability
AOL 5.0

PROBLEM: Call Waiting
If you have call waiting, it is important that you have your computer disable call waiting before connecting to our servers. Failure to disable call waiting may cause you to disconnect when you receive another call while online.


SOLUTION: Prefix the dial-up phone number with *70, (note the comma). In Windows 95/98, click the start button, select settings, select control panel, double-click on the Modems icon, Click the Dialing Properties button, Select "This location has call waiting" and use the pull down menu to select *70,


PROBLEM: Call Notes
Call notes produces a different dial-tone when you have messages. This dial-tone is not what you modem wants to hear so it gives up, often with the message, "No Dial-Tone"


SOLUTION: Remove your messages


PROBLEM: Windows Family Logon
When your computer is set to use the Windows Family Logon, you may have problems connecting to the internet or staying connected. You may also experience frequent errors while online or mysterious messages.


SOLUTION: Remove the Family Logon and switch to "Windows Logon" or "Client for Microsoft Networks". To do this, Click the Start button, Settings, Control Panel, Network icon, and under "Primary Network Logon", change it to read one of the above (NOT Family Logon).


PROBLEM: AOL 5.0
America Online version 5.0: When you install it, it can alter parts of the operating system so that if you decide to change from AOL to another way of getting on the Internet, you can't. Some users have reported problems related to connection reliability (frequent or unexplained disconnections) caused by the faulty performance of the Windows Family Logon (see above) which may not be able to remove under the AOL 5.0 installation.


SOLUTION: Remove AOL 5.0 or remove and re-install your Windows Dial-up Network Adapter, TCP/IP protocol and Microsoft Network. For more information on how to do this, see: http://aol.about.com/internet/aol/library/bl_Win98.htm?iam=dp&terms=AOL+fix+for+ISPs+over+5.0


PROBLEM: Windows Extended Uptime
If you leave your Windows 95 or 98 computer on too long, you may notice a degradation in service and reliability. This especially can affect network operations and internet programs: Outlook Express (Email and POP errors), Internet Explorer (application errors) and other types of online software. If you are experiencing strange problems that didn't exist before, it could be a problem with leaving Windows 95/98 on too long. NOTE: Certain games and graphic-intensive applications can degrade the integrity of Windows 95/98 and cause similar problems.


SOLUTION: Shutdown and reboot your computer. Continue to do so on a more frequent basis. The alternative is to install another operating system (e.g. Windows NT/2000 or Linux).


PROBLEM: Phone Line Condition
Your house phone lines were intended for voice communication and may not support high speed data communication. Occasionally, you may be in an area that has poor line quality support for modem communication. These lines may have a coil between you and the Central Office which may help voice traffic but drastically reduces your modem connection rate and reliability. The reason that you may experience slower connections or difficulty in remaining connected is due in part to your modem's aggressive nature to operate at a higher speed than what the phone line can support.


SOLUTION: Limit your modem to connect at a slower rate and thus provide a more reliable connection. Ironically, this may appear to speed up your modem simply because the modem is no longer "fighting" to gain a higher speed (that "negotiation" occurs throughout your online session unless you limit it to a lower rate). The way you limit your modem is dependant upon the manufacturer and model. Some models will work well by just adding comas after the dial-up number (e.g. 6221126,,,,,). Experiment by adding five comas and then reducing the number. This method tells the modem to "pause" after it dials and causes your modem to connect at a slower rate depending upon how many comas there are.

With Windows 95/98 you can send additional settings to your modem as follows: Click the Start button, select settings, select control panel, double-click on the Modems icon, Click the Properties button, select the Connection tab, Click the Advanced button and put your modem's additional settings in the Extra Settings box. A few common solutions are show below:

Modem Extra Setting
Creative Labs Modemblaster AT+MS=11
or
AT+MS=V34
3COM & USR ATS32=34S13=64
HSP & PC Tel ATN0S37=12
(note: 0 is zero)
Lucent Chipset ATS38=0-V90=0
(disables V.90 & K56flex)
Motorola SM56 %B18
PC Tel n0s37=14s34=5

See also http://808hi.com/56k/index.htm for a list of other modems.


PROBLEM: Modem Reliability
Certain modems are known to be unreliable at higher speeds. As with the phone line conditions, you may notice slower connections, difficulty in getting connected, or frequent disconnects. This is symptomatic of a modem that has a dated or buggy implementation of the V.90 or K56Flex code. It is also possible that the modem is trying to achieve a higher connection rate than what is possible with the phone lines.


SOLUTION: Contact the computer or modem manufacturer for a "firmware upgrade" to support the latest V.90 code. If you are unable to do that, or you already have upgraded and are still experiencing problems, you must limit your modem to connect at a slower rate and thus provide a more reliable connection. Ironically, this may appear to speed up your modem simply because the modem is no longer "fighting" to gain a higher speed (that "negotiation" occurs throughout your online session unless you limit it to a lower rate). The way you limit your modem is dependant upon the manufacturer and model. Some models will work well by just adding comas after the dial-up number (e.g. 6221126,,,,,). Experiment by adding five comas and then reducing the number. This method tells the modem to "pause" after it dials and causes your modem to connect at a slower rate depending upon how many comas there are.

With Windows 95/98 you can send additional settings to your modem as follows: Click the Start button, select settings, select control panel, double-click on the Modems icon, Click the Properties button, select the Connection tab, Click the Advanced button and put your modem's additional settings in the Extra Settings box. A few common solutions are show below:

Modem Extra Setting
Creative Labs Modemblaster AT+MS=11
or
AT+MS=V34
3COM & USR ATS32=34S13=64
HSP & PcTel ATN0S37=12
(note: 0 is zero)
Lucent Chipset

ATS38=0-V90=0
(disables V.90 & K56flex)

Motorola SM56 %B18
PC Tel n0s37=14s34=5
Rockwell / Conexant HCF

AT+MS=V34


If the trash can isn't an option:
Add comas to the phone number
but expect to continue to have
problems with these modems.
See http://808hi.com/56k/rockhcf.htm
for more information.

 

For 56K modem information see http://808hi.com/56k/index.htm

 

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